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Statewide – Recycling Makes Cents.

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We have some world-class composting facilities here in SA, which means if you live in a metropolitan council, you can put bones (cooked or raw) into the green bin!

For more info on what can or can't go in the green bin, check out this great blog by Jeffries - jeffries.com.au/what-can-go-in-my-green-bin-2020/

If you are in a regional area, check with your local council first 😊
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We have some world-class composting facilities here in SA, which means if you live in a metropolitan council, you can put bones (cooked or raw) into the green bin!

For more info on what can or cant go in the green bin, check out this great blog by Jeffries - https://jeffries.com.au/what-can-go-in-my-green-bin-2020/

If you are in a regional area, check with your local council first 😊

The waxed paper or cardboard food and drink packaging from major fast food outlets are unfortunately not compostable or easily recyclable and should go into the landfill bin.

The nonwaxed paper carry bag (e.g. pictured) is fine for composting however!
... See MoreSee Less

The waxed paper or cardboard food and drink packaging from major fast food outlets are unfortunately not compostable or easily recyclable and should go into the landfill bin. 

The nonwaxed paper carry bag (e.g. pictured) is fine for composting however!

 

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But the brown paper bags are just paper - I know as I often pick them up in my street and they can go in the organics bin. Just not the "cardboard" cups, I am fairly sure.

So milk cartons, fruit juice cartons soup and stock cartons are fine for recycling but cardboard takeaway food containers are not. All the former look as though they have a coating - shiny finish out and in. What is this coating?

Can the straw go in a milk carton and the lid go in recycling?

Do you know where subway wrappers go?

Mae Simmons Shane Caudle

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It is best to avoid styrofoam meat trays or takeaway food containers, as these are landfill items. Packing styrofoam can be recycled, but ONLY if taken directly to recycling facilities such as NAWMA (www.nawma.sa.gov.au). ... See MoreSee Less

It is best to avoid styrofoam meat trays or takeaway food containers, as these are landfill items. Packing styrofoam can be recycled, but ONLY if taken directly to recycling facilities such as NAWMA (www.nawma.sa.gov.au).

 

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Colleen

are there any locations in the south that recycle packing Styrofoam?

F

F

Who's been embracing the cold weather by getting the oven going? Unfortunately baking paper is not compostable or recyclable. Instead, try a well-oiled tin/tray or reusable silicone baking sheets. ... See MoreSee Less

Whos been embracing the cold weather by getting the oven going? Unfortunately baking paper is not compostable or recyclable. Instead, try a well-oiled tin/tray or reusable silicone baking sheets.

 

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This was one of the tough ones to kick, managed to breakup with gladwrap cold turkey years ago, so used the same tactic for baking paper. If I don’t have it, I have to think of something else. I no longer use any baking paper, back to oil and flouring tins, pizza trays, biscuit trays, and muffins. Works just fine.

There is a certified compostable baking paper on the market (see photo). I use it and can confirm that it works well. I use the reusable baking sheets too but this stuff is great for round cake tins or other odd shapes where you need to cut it to size. I got it from Brighton Foodland but it’s also available at online eco shops.

Well I did not know that about baking paper. Thank you for the heads up & I’ll not be using in the future!

I'm currently using up a roll I've had for years but an washing and re-using the sheets a few times before I put them in the bin. I usually have a silicone sheet or, as this articles suggests, oil the pan/baking dish really well.

There is biodegradable baking paper now. Glad have a biodegradable one. Surely that is suitable for composting.

Has anyone seen the 4 Four Corners program last night? Australia's recycling is a farce.

Can I ask what about it makes it not compostable please?

Well thanks. I was not aware. But why? And why OK in home compost but not in greens bin as suggested below. Honestly try but schemes to penalise when information so obscure and absolutely not intuitive infuriate me.

So this Multix stuff must go to landfill too, despite being marketed as “greener”?

Thanks for the post and discussion, KESAB.

What about the old school 'wax-proof' paper (dif to baking paper)?

I wrote to the SA Gov site Which Bin to ask them about this after I couldn't find it on their list. And I got an answer - now who says our government workers are anything other than on the job, it was after dinner! - 'Funny you should mention that! It is a commonly asked question, and we're about to incorporate it :) You'll be pleased to hear that if you look carefully for the Australian Standard logo (attached), which means certified compostable, there are now baking paper products on supermarket shelves which are compostable and can be placed into the green bin, so our advice in the A-Z will include that.' So, yes, as discussed earlier, there are some which are COMPOSTABLE. (And yes, biodegradable is practically meaningless. It certainly doesn't mean you can put it in your organics bin.)

Compostable in your home compost but not the green bin.

Oh, whoops, sorry. I've been green bining. I'll cease

Who knew? Please see comments below. 🌱 🍃 🌳

Jessica McCallum we should look into something else

Jessica Jellett

Jessica-Anne Panaguiton I didn’t know this.. 😕

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