Pasadena and Frewville Foodlands eliminate plastic produce bags

Pasadena and Frewville Foodlands eliminate plastic produce bags

 

We are excited to announce Frewville and Pasadena Foodlands have today officially switched to fully compostable produce bags for all fresh fruit and vegetables, deli and baked products. This initiative is an Australian first and part of an ongoing partnership between Adelaide’s Finest Supermarkets and KESAB environmental solutions.

It is estimated the change will save more than 3 million plastic bags annually (the equivalent of approximately 7 tonnes of plastic waste). The compostable alternative now provided is made  in South Australia by BioBag World Australia, using cornstarch rather than petroleum. Unlike ‘biodegradable’ plastics, these certified compostable bags will completely break down when placed into a kerbside green bin or home compost, leaving no micro-plastics or chemical residues behind.

This is the latest in a series of environmental initiatives by Adelaide’s Finest Supermarkets and KESAB, which have included the Pack ‘n Go system launched last year, allowing customers to BYO containers for bulk foods, deli products and meat, and the phase-out of all single-use plastic straws stirrers and cutlery. KESAB has also been working with Frewville and Pasadena to greatly reduce the amount of in-house waste sent to landfill, with the introduction of organic waste separation (sent to Peats Soil for composting), and separate recycling for soft plastics and mixed recyclables.

Adelaide’s Finest Supermarkets Director Spero Chapley said the introduction of the compostable bags was another step towards reducing their stores’ impact on the environment.

“The partnership with KESAB has been invaluable in better understanding our environmental impact and how this can be minimised,” said Mr Chapley.

Compostable produce bags now available instore at Pasadena and Frewville Foodlands

“We’re working with KESAB to better understand the issues with biodegradability of key products and what other alternatives are available and continue to conduct a department by department approach.

“We’ve already reintroduced paper bags at the checkout and continue to work closely with our suppliers to reduce the amount of plastic used in product packaging, particular fresh fruit and vegetables.

“The outcomes achieved so far demonstrate improvement in community understanding of environmental sustainability issues, and this has led to behavioural change and increased participation in programs by our community.”

The timing of the launch coincides with the announcement earlier this week that in an Australian first, the State Government has officially passed legislation to ban the use of single-use plastic in 2021, as Minister for Environment and Water David Speirs, who helped launch the initiative noted.

“South Australia has always led the way when it comes to waste management and Frewville and Pasadena Foodland’s move towards compostable bags is just another great example of this,” said Minister Speirs.

KESAB CEO Wendy Bevan said “KESAB has been proudly working with Adelaide’s Finest Supermarkets to reduce their environmental impact and we are thrilled with the leadership taken by them to voluntarily remove single-use produce bags in their stores. It really shows that businesses can be environmentally pro-active ahead of any legislation and KESAB certainly hopes other supermarkets take their lead from this initiative”.

KESAB CEO Wendy Bevan, at the BioBag launch

Owned by the Chapley Family, Adelaide’s Finest Supermarkets through its Foodland Pasadena and Frewville stores, are also major supporters of South Australian suppliers.

Adelaide’s Finest Supermarkets employ more than 600 staff across its two stores including many traditional trades like butchers, bakers, florists and fishmongers.

The company’s policy of no self-service checkouts maximises employment opportunities for local people and helps to ensure a higher standard of customer service.

For more information visit https://www.adelaidesfinest.com.au

Posted in Behaviour change, Business, Community, Composting, Education, Plastic, South Australia, Sustainable Communities

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